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Noticeboard

Coronavirus


 


Key Messages


 


Based on the current position in regards to the coronavirus, the key messages for the general public


are:


 



  • If you have travelled to the UK from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea,Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau in the previous 14 days and are experiencing cough or fever or shortness of breath, you should to stay indoors, call your GP or if your surgery is closed ring NHS 24 (111) informing them of your symptoms and your recent travel.




  • Do not leave home until you have been given advice by a clinician.


 



  • This is peak season for respiratory and flu-like illness. There will be cases presenting with symptoms of cough, fever and shortness of breath, but these are highly unlikely to be novel coronavirus.


 



  • The public can be assured that Scotland is always well prepared for these types of outbreak and will remain vigilant. We have a proven track record of dealing with challenging health issues and have established public health and infectious disease experts working round the clock.


 To protect yourself and others, it is best to:



  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze.

  • Bin the tissue.

  • To kill germs, wash your hands with soap and water, or use a sanitiser gel.


    For the latest public information on coronavirus visit www.nhsinform.scot/coronavirus



General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies from 25th May 2018 : click on Practice Policies for more information.


Ladies between the age of 16-64 can attend Boots Pharmacy in Beauly if they feel they have a urine infection and can be treated by the pharmacist.

Tests & Results

Test Results

Our reception staff are not qualified to comment on results therefore it is your responsibility to check them and make any necessary follow-up appointment with the doctor.

It is the patient's responsibility to phone for results, however we will usually contact patients if any action needs to be taken after a blood test or X-ray.

 We ask that you leave a minimum of 1 week after your blood test and 2 weeks after an X-ray was taken before phoning for a result, unless a GP has indicated that result will be available sooner.

 Please phone between 2-5pm for results.

Please note that we do have a strict policy regarding confidentiality and data protection. In this respect we will only give out results to the person they relate to unless that person has given prior permission for their release or if they are not capable of understanding them.

Blood Tests


A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken for testing in a laboratory. Blood tests have a wide range of uses and are one of the most common types of medical test. For example, a blood test can be used to:

  • assess your general state of health
  • confirm the presence of a bacterial or viral infection
  • see how well certain organs, such as the liver and kidneys, are functioning
A blood test usually involves the phlebotomist taking a blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm. and the usual place for a sample is the inside of the elbow or wrist, where the veins are relatively close to the surface. Blood samples from children are most commonly taken from the back of the hand. The child's hand will be anaesthetised (numbed) with a special cream before the sample is taken.

 

You can find out more about blood tests, their purpose and the way they are performed on the NHS Choices website.

X-Ray

doctor examining an x-rayAn X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

If you have a X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.



 
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